Welcome to the Official
SWANsat Holdings
Executive Online Briefing Pages


Our SWANsat Magna Carta
0. Due Diligence Materials
1. Executive Summary
2. Technical Documents
3. Ex-Im Bank Funding Guarantee
4. Information Memorandums
5. Funding & Investments
6. Marketing Structure
7. FERA and Senate Bill 2433
8. Backhaul Tower Support
9. South Sudan Proposals
10. Host Country Documents
11. ITU Filings
12. mySWANbank
13. Reports to Friends of SWANsat
14. Bio for Dr. William P. Welty
15. Conferences Addressed
16. Landing Rights Issues
17. United Nations Responses
18. Islamic Banking Issues
19. World Bank and ODA
20. Links that Mention SWANsat
21. The LIBERTY™ Suite
22. SWANsat Aerospace, Our Vendor
23. Relations with the African Union
26. Milestones: Progress to Date
24. The NEPAD Council
25. AUric/Global Settlement Foundation
27. Press Reports about SWANsat
28. Press Images and Logos
29. Mauritius Documents
30. On Visionaries...

The contents of this executive briefing are COPYRIGHT © 1996-2016 SWANsat Holdings, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED INTERNATIONALLY. Access to these pages is by permission of SWANsat Holdings personnel only.

Instructions:

Choose the topic for which you wish to obtain a briefing from the table of contents to the left. Double click on the topic and a list of documents will display that can be downloaed.

Locations of visitors to this page

 

 

 


Section XIX: World Bank and ODA


On the World Bank and SWANsat

The African Union needs a 21st century equivalent to the post-World War II Marshall Plan, and SWANsat can be that plan if the banking bureaucrats will let it happen. We composed a letter, dated 1 July 2007 and delivered to the World Bank's new president Robert Zoellick, regarding how this might be so. We also sent him a white paper dealing with the subject of how SWANsat could serve as a modern Marshall Plan for the African Union.

Download a PDF copy of our letter dated 1 July 2007 to Robert Zoellick.

Download our White Paper: A Modern Marshall Plan for the African Union

Financial Times article: Why Africa Needs a Marshall Plan

Download a PDF copy of the letter to Robert Zoellick with all these attachments.

As noted in our white paper Shareware Telecommunications, the SWANsat System provides what is arguably the first economic model for bridging the digital divide to LDC's and DC's through very low cost (about EUR€1/month) delivery of high speed broadband internet anywhere in the world. The Shareware Telecommunications model accomplishes this without debt to LDC's, DC's, or to other emerging nations. As a result of our letter to Dr. Zoellick, we were invited to address a committee composed of several World Bank Group executives. On 19 July we sent a pre-meeting letter to Ken Lupberger at the World Bank in preparation for the conference.

Download a PDF copy of our letter dated 19 July 2007 to Mr. Lupberger.

The letter to Mr. Lupberger contained a draft copy of our proposed landing rights Memorandum of Understanding for participation by the African Union in SWANsat. Then we visited the World bank. Every single executive with whom we met—all of them—expressed extreme pessimism about SWANsat.

Then, in October 2007, just before we left the United States to attend the Connect Africa Summit, Dr. Zoellick addressed an assembly of all 185 member nations of the World Bank, where he provided a public commitment to where he wanted the World Bank to be over the next few years. So on 23 October 2007 we sent Dr. Zoellick another letter in which we outlined our concerns regarding the difference between what HE said versus what HIS TEAM said at our meeting:

Download a PDF copy of our letter dated  23 October to Dr. Zoellick.

On 12 November the World Bank responded through Dr. Zoellick's representative Mr. Mohsen Khalil, Director of the Global Information and Communication Technologies Department.

Download a PDF copy of Mr. Khalil's fax received by us on 15 November.

Mr. Khalil's letter appeared to us to represent a not-so-covert attempt to rationalize the behavior of the group of executives who had met with us during the summer. So we rebutted Mr. Khalil's letter, providing what the diplomats might call a "frank exchange of views".

Download a PDF copy of our rebuttal letter dated 17 November to Mr. Khalil.

Then we sent a copy of our rebuttal letter to Dr. Zoellick.


Back to top

Exit this Private Section and Go to SWANsat Foundation Home Page

Go to SWANsat Home Page


Relating SWANsat to ODA

Gross National Product
Contributions to ODA

Norway

Denmark

Luxembourg

Sweden

Netherlands

Portugal

Belgium

France

Switzerland

Ireland

UK

Finland

Germany

Canada

Australia

Spain

Austria

Greece

New Zealand

Japan

USA

Italy

0.87%

0.85%

0.83%

0.78%

0.73%

0.63%

0.41%

0.41%

0.41%

0.39%

0.36%

0.35%

0.28%

0.27%

0.25%

0.24%

0.23%

0.23%

0.23%

0.19%

0.17%

0.15%

With respect to Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitments, on 24 October 1970, United Nations General Assembly Resolution 2626 (XXV) was passed. The resolution included a provision that:

Each economically advanced country will progressively increase its official development assistance to the developing countries and will exert its best efforts to reach a minimum net amount of 0.7 per cent of its gross national product at market prices by the middle of the Decade.

The United States reaffirmed its 0.7% GNP contribution commitment earlier in the present decade as part of the Monterrey Consensus. Nevertheless, the fact remains that today the United States of America contributes only about 0.17% of its GNP at market prices—less than 25% of its original commitment. As the statistics listed to the right demonstrate, the United States is nearly last on the list... We propose that SWANsat be made an Official Development Assistance Project, with the provisioning nation underscoring this commitment by providing a fiscal incentive for businesses and citizens to participate in bridging the digital divide through their domestic taxation policies. By doing so, governments will not have to increase their ODA ICI/ICT sector budgets to meet their ODA objectives. If, for example, a new taxation law stated that for every $1 received by an approved charity specifically for the SWANSAT project, the donor receives a multi-dollar tax credit and/or a tax-deducible receipt, then the additional value added would represent the difference between the face value of the donation and the actual value of the SWANSAT system, inevitably impacting the calculation of the nation’s overall ODA contribution.

How to Double America's ODA Contribution

As noted in our white paper Shareware Telecommunications, the SWANsat System provides what is arguably the first economic model for bridging the digital divide to LDC's and DC's through very low cost (about EUR€1/month) delivery of high speed broadband internet anywhere in the world. The Shareware Telecommunications model accomplishes this without debt to LDC's, DC's, or to other emerging nations.

We are proposing that appropriate federal legislation be passed that authorizes the SWANSAT Shareware Telecommunications model to be utilized as a vehicle to boost America’s ODA contribution from its current levels. When fully deployed and operational, as much as USD$2 billion per month of post-launch revenue has been pledged by SWANSAT to be contributed toward bringing inexpensive ICT to LDC’s and DC’s—via monthly grants amounting to as much as 99% of the cost of service account subscriptions to citizens and residents of these countries. We want to see these contributions credited to America’s annual ODA commitment. Since America’s ODA for Fiscal Year 2006 was about USD$25 billion, if SWANSAT funding contributions are credited toward America’s ODA requirement, America’s ODA contribution will effectively double—from 0.17% GNP to nearly 0.34% GNP—all without any actual additional funds coming directly from the Treasury of the United States of America.

American businesses who participate as vendors to the SWANSAT System will benefit from their participation because the funds that they would otherwise have paid in federal taxes will be used to further their own business interests, keeping their employees working and giving the participating vendor the right to claim corporate credit for helping to bridge the digital divide. Antecedent to launch, up to USD$2 billion per year can be added to America’s ODA contribution figures if the proposal outlined below becomes part of the federal tax code. We suggest that specialized legislation will be needed that will accomplish at least the following objectives:

a. Authorize federal tax credits for individuals and businesses who provide services and goods as described below toward financing the SWANSAT System.

b. Allow federal tax credits (i.e., deductions from all federal taxes due, not deductions from taxable income) for all goods and services provided to SWANSAT’s spacecraft vendor IOSTAR Corporation for design, construction, launch, deployment, and ongoing operation of the SWANSAT System.

c. Allow similar federal tax credits at the level of the manufacturer’s full suggested retail price (MSRP) for all end user handsets, receiver sets, and other earth segment hardware devices that are provided by the SWANSAT Holdings, LLC charitable beneficiaries for distribution to governments, businesses, Non-Government Organization (NGO, i.e., non-profit organizations), and citizens of LDC’s and DC’s and to those who provide Non-Government Organization-based charitable services to those citizens.

d. Allow similar federal tax credits at the level of the manufacturer’s full suggested retail price (MSRP) for all delivery services provided by international shippers (FedEx, UPS, DHL, etc.) who contribute their services to deliver end user handsets, receiver sets, and other earth segment hardware devices for use by governments, businesses, NGO’s, and citizens of LDC’s and DC’s and to those who provide NGO-based charitable services to those citizens.

e. Allow similar federal tax credits at the level of the producer’s full suggested retail price (MSRP) for all ICT programming services provided by internet service providers and satellite-delivered video and audio programming services providers, who contribute their services for subsidized delivery to governments, businesses, NGO’s, and citizens of LDC’s and DC’s and to those who provide NGO-based charitable services to those citizens.

f. Authorize all funds described in the paragraphs above to be claimed by the United States as Official Development Assistance, since the value of these services, as well as operational surpluses from SWANsat services delivered to citizens of G8 nations, will be directly applied toward delivery of low-cost ICT broadband to LDC’s and DC’s. (Without such authorization, the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD] has no authority to apply funds contributed to America’s ODA contribution.)


Back to top

Exit this Private Section and Go to SWANsat Foundation Home Page

Go to SWANsat Home Page


Bi-partisan Appeal?

The proposed legislation can appeal to Republicans because it has the effect of lowering federal taxes by allowing tax credits to reduce the contributor’s federal tax bill. And, it can appeal to Democrats who like the idea of America doubling its current ODA payments. Republicans might like the proposed legislation because it links American businesses to the first effective economic model yet devised to bridge the digital divide, thus giving them some social responsibility bragging rights. Come to think of it, maybe Democrats might like it for that reason, too. Accordingly, we might be able to craft a rare, but plausible bi-partisan cooperation to see this legislation through to becoming part of the federal tax code. Here's our letter dated 28 January 2009 to Senator Dianne Feinstein that discusses this issue:

On Bi-Partisan Cooperation in Economic Recovery through passage of SB 2433

Reports, Transcripts, and Publications

UN Report: Monterrey Consensus Report
UN Report:
Building on Monterrey

UN Report: Secretary-General's Preliminary Report on Monterrey

Also, on 8 June 2005, Sony Kapoor gave testimony before the House Subcommittee on Domestic and International Monetary Policy, Trade and Technology. What Mr. Kapoor had to say bears directly on the use of the SWANsat System as a means to meet America's ODA commitment to provide 0.7% of its GNP to help LDC's and DC's.

Publications by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

OECD analysis: 2006 ODA Data (coming soon)
OECD analysis: 2005 ODA Data
OECD memorandum: Is it ODA?
OECD report: Statistical Reporting Directive
OECD report: List of OECD Recipients of Official Development Assistance

OECD's Development Assistance Committee (DAC) Publications Relating to Security

DAC Handbook on Security Reform
DAC Security Policy Briefing
DAC Security System Reform

Specific Links to OECD

OECD web: Home page
OECD web: Development Aid from OECD Countries Falls in 2006
OECD web: How to Determine ODA Eligibility

Development Assistance Committee (DAC) Members' net ODA
1990-2006 and DAC Secretariat simulations of net ODA to 2010.

Click on this image to visit the source page at the OECD web site...

 
 

Back to top

Back to SWANsat Foundation Home Page

Go to SWANsat (General Interest) Home Page


Contents of this site Copyright © 1996-2013 by SWANsat Holdings, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED INTERNATIONALLY. This page posted pursuant to SWANsat's General Terms of Use. This site was last modified on Monday, February 17, 2014 15:45 -0800.